NOFA-NY Blog

Our blog is a great way to stay current on organic farming, gardening, certification, policy, and community information and issues that we regularly share. We help you stay on top of everything that relates to technical and practical organic farming and gardening, timely and important legislative policies, field days, conferences, consumer issues, and more.

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Peak Season at Sang Lee Farms

Peak Season at Sang Lee Farms

Field Notes: NOFA-NY’s Summer Blog Series

This blog post is the first in our summer blog series highlighting NOFA-NY’s on-farm field days. We’ve got many more field days coming up in July and August – learn more here!

Host Farm: Sang Lee Farms
Location: Peconic, New York
Date: May 22, 2019

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Our 37th Winter Conference

Our 37th Winter Conference
 

Thank you to all who attended NOFA-NY’s 37th Annual Organic Farming & Gardening Conference! In spite of the weather, you came together to share stories, celebrate seeds, exchange ideas, dance and play trivia. I have heard some wonderful feedback about the quality of the workshops, the keynote speakers, the children’s conference, and the sense of community.

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Better Manage Your High Tunnel Soils

Better Manage Your High Tunnel Soils

If you grow with high tunnels, have you noticed that for the first few years your tunnel crops have amazing yields with healthy plants, but after four or five years the crops just don’t seem to do as well? Maybe you keep watering, adding compost or fertigating with fish emulsion, but it’s never quite as awesome as the first years. There’s a story about soils in this dynamic that has come from NOFA-NY’s collaboration with the Cornell Vegetable Program’s Judson Reid and Cordelia Machanoff on a two-year NYFVI-funded high tunnel project. Judson Reid designed the research project to investigate what goes on in the high tunnel soils that ends this fertility honeymoon period, before a collaborative effort with participating growers determined the best strategies to maintain high tunnel soil quality for the long haul.

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The Organic Dairy Transition Dream

Thank you to Robert Perry, our education team grain and field crops coordinator for writing this excellent blog.

The conventional milk prices’ diminishing return on the cost of production has been cause for a recent trend that sent dairy farmers who are on the fence about organic production scrambling for information and an organic transition plan for their farm. NOFA-NY has a technical assistance program that provides answers to some of the challenges confronting farmers today, and the dairy questions have been primarily, “I want to transition my dairy to organic.” While no quick fix exists for an average conventional farm, the one-to-three year timeline for transition creates a path for those serious in their goal. However, my first question to the caller is, “do you have a market?”

The certification process and the tools to develop an organic farm plan and tackle the application forms are what NOFA-NY Certified Organic LLC staff and the NOFA-NY INC technical assistance program do best. certification process

But finding the organic market for the individual farmers’ milk is a personal journey. There are numerous players with various incentives and regional determinations for pick-up and contracts to sign.  When the milk tank is full, the waiting list begins.

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In Gratitude to Farmers

Sondra Gjersoe, our trusty Administrative Assistant shares her love and respect for farmers as a backyard gardener...

I’ve always had a passion for gardening, from the days of growing herbs in pots on the windowsill of my cramped apartment to planting flowers along the front walkway of my house. I never really felt at home without a bit of greenery around to liven up the place. This year I decided (on a bit of a whim, I must confess) to go beyond growing tomatoes and peppers on the patio and begin to dabble a bit more in growing my own fruits and vegetables.

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